Innovative solutions for creating healthy, efficient, eco-friendly homes

October 2007

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Green Luxury Condos

When most homeowners think of greenbuilding, they envision single-family homes with bamboo floors, solar panels and high-efficiency heating and cooling systems. But builders across the country are proving that condominium projects can be just as green.In municipalities as diverse as Chicago and Las Vegas, Los Angeles and New York City, environmentally friendly condo towers are rising. In the pages that follow, we spotlight four of these cutting-edge residential projects.

How Does Your Home Rate?

The word on the street is that 2007 will be the "tipping point" for green building. Undeniably, green building has turned the corner over the last year or so, and residential green building rating systems are helping to develop the market.

Recycling Made Easy

Drop an aluminum can or plastic bottle into the top of the award-winning ecopod Home Recycling Center, step on a pedal at the bottom of the unit and presto! The aluminum or plastic container is instantly compacted and dropped into a portable pod at the bottom of the recycling unit. The pod can hold 50 to 60 crushed containers, and when it's full, homeowners can easily remove the pod to recycle the containers at curbside collection or a redemption station.

Innovative Luxury Bathrooms

Innovative Luxury Bathrooms

Today's luxury bathrooms include all the aesthetic elements present in the rest of the home. Their utilitarian purpose has been overshadowed in recent years by a growing range of upscale design options, from the sybaritic pleasures promised by mood-elevating chromatherapy baths to artistic touches like vessel sinks made from wood or stone, to showers that create a soothing rain-like experience or envelop you in therapeutic steam.

Green on a Budget

A green, energy-efficient home doesn't have to be expensive. That's the lesson behind a new home that has recently been completed in the Virginia mountain city of Roanoke.Back in 2005, an international competition was held to find a home design that best followed the principles set out by the cradle to cradle philosophy, as envisioned by architect William McDonough and German chemist Michael Braungart.

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